• Shake Up Your Sake Habit with These Cocktails

    For many people, Japanese dining and sake go hand-in-hand. If you frequently order this rice wine when you visit Japanese restaurants and want to enjoy it in new ways, then keep reading for some for some sake cocktail ideas.

    Cherry Sake Cocktail

    Can’t quite let go of summer? If so, then the cherry sake cocktail is for you. To make this fruity drink, you will need frozen cherries, sake, and ginger ale. To give the drink a more enticing appearance, add just a couple of drops of red food coloring.

    Sake Champagne Mojito

    If you enjoy traditional mojitos, then don’t pass up on the sake champagne mojito. For this recipe, you’ll need sake, extra dry champagne, fresh mint, lime juice, and liquid stevia. After muddling the mint, stevia, and lime juice, add the sake and champagne, stir, and serve over ice.

    Raspberry Sake Tea

    For something sweet, fruity, and fresh, consider trying a raspberry sake tea cocktail. This simple drink uses just raspberry flavored tea bags, sugar, water, and sake. The tea should first be brewed and then mixed with the sugar and left to cool in the refrigerator. To serve, mix in the sake and pour over ice. For added appeal, toss in a handful or fresh raspberries.

    Kyoho Cobbler

    If you want to make a visual statement, then the Kyoho cobbler hits the mark. This sake cocktail calls for sherry, sake, cachaça, white vermouth, gomme syrup, lemon juice, shiso leaves, and Kyoho grapes.

    Tangerine Ginger Sake Sangria

    Perfect for those warm afternoons in late summer and early fall, the tangerine ginger sake sangria is a sweet and spicy beverage that is delicious and easy to make. This sangria is made with sake, fresh ginger, sugar, water, tangerines, and fresh mint.

    You can find the recipes for these cocktails by clicking here.

    To enjoy some creative cocktails in a Japanese steakhouse setting, visit House of Genji for dinner or Happy Hour in our cocktail lounge in San Jose. To make your reservation, please call (408) 453-8120.

  • Healthy Sides to Go with Your Teppanyaki Meal

    One of the best things about Japanese food is that, in addition to being tasty, it can also be extremely healthy. Even if you are committed to a healthy eating lifestyle or are watching your caloric intake, teppanyaki can still be on the menu. There are plenty of healthy sides you can choose to supplement your Japanese dining experience and make your meal even more enjoyable.

    A popular Japanese side dish and appetizer that is also a healthy choice is edamame. These young soybeans in their pods are often boiled and served simply with salt for a tasty, protein-packed treat. Ahi tuna is also popular on Japanese menus and is typically served lightly seared, letting the rich flavor shine. Soups and salads are also commonly ordered as side dishes with teppanyaki meals.

    House of Genji has an extensive menu of Japanese dishes, alongside our popular teppanyaki meals. If you have any questions about teppanyaki dining in San Jose, call us at (408) 453-8120.

  • Go Off the Beaten Track in Tokyo

    Tokyo is a large, bustling city, and for visitors, it can be hard to discover the real culture outside of the tourist areas. By getting off the beaten track, you will be able to find the best Japanese restaurants, bars, clubs, and shopping.

    Watch this video to learn about some places to visit in Tokyo that are outside of the typical tourist attractions. Try some of these places for a more authentic Japanese experience when you visit the country.

    For a taste of authentic Japanese food in San Jose, choose House of Genji. Our Japanese dining includes teppanyaki, hibachi, and much more. You can learn more about our menu by calling (408) 453-8120.

  • Answering FAQs About Yukatas

    Kimonos are easily recognizable as traditional Japanese clothing to many people, but yukatas are less well-known. They look similar to kimonos, but they are worn at different times and are made of different materials. If you travel to Japan, you may encounter many yukatas, depending on the time of year of your trip. There, you’ll see them everywhere, from people dining on Japanese food in hotel restaurants to fireworks displays. Here are the answers to some questions that people often have about yukatas.

    How are yukatas different from kimonos?

    Yukatas look very similar to kimonos, but they are not the same. While kimonos are made of silk, yukatas are made from lighter fabrics, including cotton, and are usually designed using brighter colors than kimonos. Yukatas also have fewer layers than kimonos. Because of the lighter fabrics and layers, yukatas are worn in the summertime to many of the same places people might wear kimonos at other times of the year. Yukatas are also significantly more affordable than kimonos, which means that more people have them and wear them.

    How do I put on a yukata?

    The first step is to put the yukata on as you would a robe. Be sure to put the right side underneath the left side. Putting the right side of clothing over the left is done when the dead are prepared for burial and should never be done in life. After the yukata is wrapped appropriately, tie the obi, or sash, around your waist. Start with the ends towards your back, and end by tying the obi in a bow in the front.

    When should I wear a yukata?

    Traditional Japanese hotels often give yukatas to guests to wear around the property and in the neighboring towns. They are also traditionally worn to festivals, fireworks displays, and at Japanese hot bath facilities.

    Indulge in Japanese culture with a meal at House of Genji. Our Japanese restaurant provides an authentic teppanyaki dining experience and a variety of traditional foods. For more information about Japanese food in San Jose, call (408) 453-8120.

  • What to Expect from Your First Teppanyaki Experience

    Teppanyaki is a dining experience unlike any other. Most people who go to a Japanese restaurant for teppanyaki for the first time are unsure what to expect. The first thing you can expect is to walk away from the experience excited about making plans for your next teppanyaki meal. Here is a look at what teppanyaki first-timers need to know.

    You will make new friends while you eat.

    At a teppanyaki meal, diners are seated around a grill on which their meals are cooked as they watch. If you go with a big group, you might have a grill to yourselves, but if you go with just a few friends, chances are that you will be seated with other parties. Because the chef entertains the group while cooking, you’ll find yourself interacting with other diners as you have your meal. Teppanyaki is a great chance to turn dinner into a social event, so be ready to make some new friends as you dine.

    You will gain a new appreciation for knife skills.

    One thing that diners love about teppanyaki is that the chefs truly put on a performance while they cook. The knife skills they use to slice and dice meats and veggies are amazing to watch and are the result of years of hard work and training. In addition to their knife skills, teppanyaki chefs also use their spatulas and other tools to toss, catch, and flip foods with lightening speeds. A common teppanyaki game you might experience is the chef flipping a small veggie or piece of meat into the mouth of a diner.

    You will get to customize your meal to your liking.

    Because your chef is cooking your meal right in front of you, you can specify every part of it, from the meat used in your dish to the veggies and spices added. You’ll also have a selection of sauces and condiments to flavor your meal to your personal tastes.

    If you’ve never experienced teppanyaki, then make House of Genji part of your plans tonight. We’re here to answer your questions about teppanyaki and the rest of our menu any time. Call our Japanese restaurant in San Jose at (408) 453-8120.

  • Why Teppanyaki Is Perfect for Blind Dates

    Whether you’ve been set up by friends or found each other on Tinder, meeting for the first time for a date is nerve-racking. To take some of the pressure off, consider planning your date for someplace fun with lots of activity going on, to help make conversation a little easier. Teppanyaki is the perfect solution for breaking the ice on blind dates.

    Meeting for dinner is common on blind dates, but sitting together and trying to come up with conversation is a lot of pressure. When you opt for Japanese dining teppanyaki-style, you still get to share a meal, but you also get to enjoy the entertainment together. The showmanship of the chefs is enough to carry any lulls in conversation, and you’ll be surrounded by conversation starters, so you’ll have plenty of things to discuss.

    Add a few drinks from the cocktail lounge at House of Genji, and you have all of the right ingredients for a successful blind date. Book a table for teppanyaki in San Jose by calling (408) 453-8120.

  • Planning Your First Visit to Shibuya

    Shibuya is one of the most thriving districts in Tokyo, and it attracts visitors from all over the world. This video gives you some insight about where to go and what to see when you visit this famed Japanese neighborhood.

    Shibuya is a mecca for young people and is the capital of fashion within the city. There are endless places to shop, eat, and drink, including a coffee shop you’re unlikely to find anywhere else in the world that lets you walk a goat with the purchase of a drink.

    To fill your craving for Japanese food in San Jose, choose House of Genji. You’ll find an extensive teppanyaki menu as well as other Japanese favorites and tasty drinks from our cocktail lounge. Find out more about our Japanese dining experience by calling (408) 453-8210.

  • Trader Vic vs. Don the Beachcomber: Who Really Invented the Mai Tai?

    The Mai Tai is a favorite cocktail all over the world, and it is one of the most treasured drinks served at House of Genji. Who is responsible for creating this classic cocktail? The answer depends on who you ask. There are two different restaurateurs who claim that claim that they invented the Mai Tai, and their flavors are very different from each other. For today’s cocktail lounge guests, the history is less important than the classic flavor of this potent rum-based drink. Here’s a closer look at the history of the Mai Tai.

    Don the Beachcomber

    Don Beach was the owner of a once-popular chain of tiki-inspired restaurants in California called Don the Beachcomber. He claims to have in invented the Mai Tai in 1933 and says that Mai Tai recipes that debuted later were ripped off from his idea. The Mai Tai served by Don the Beachcomber is different from the standard Mai Tai recipe used today, and incorporated Pernod, grapefruit juice, and falernum. Because the recipe is different from today’s standard, many people dismiss Don the Beachcomber’s story today.

    Trader Vic

    Trader Vic is the person who usually gets credit for the modern Mai Tai. Trader Vic—also known as Victor J. Bergeron—is the owner of a California restaurant chain named Trade Vic’s. He claims to have created the Mai Tai when he had friends visiting from Tahiti. One friend is said to have explained, “Maita’i roa ae,” upon tasting the drink, which means “out of this world,” in Tahitian—and thus the name of the cocktail was decided. Trader Vic’s Mai Tai contains Oregeat, a mixture of dark and light rums, and orange Curacao.

    Visit the cocktail lounge at House of Genji to sip on one of our famous Mai Tai cocktails as you muse the history of the drink. You’ll also love our Japanese steakhouse menu and teppanyaki grill. Reserve your table by calling our Japanese restaurant in San Jose by calling (408) 453-8120.

  • Must-See Summer Festivals in Japan

    Summertime festivals are a way of life in Japan, and there are multiple festivals to see all over the country during the summer months. Lovers of Japanese dining will be excited to taste all of the foods that are popular at festivals. Exploring a festival is an excellent way to immerse yourself in Japanese culture and to have a once-in-a-lifetimes experience unlike anything else in the world. If you plan to visit Japan in the summer, here are some of the festivals that you can consider attending.

    Tanabata Festival

    Tanabata festival is based on a myth about the gods Orihime and Hikoboshi. Legend says that they were separated by the Milky Way but are reunited each year on the seventh day of the seventh month. Tanabata translates to “evening of seven,” and as such, it often begins on July 7. However, there are some regional variations in the start date of the festival. Tanabata festival attendees write their wishes on colorful paper and suspend them from bamboo.

    Obon

    Obon, which is also known as the Bon festival, is one of the biggest in Japan. It is held to honor ancestors and lost loved ones. People celebrate Obon in multiple ways, including doing a dance called Bon Odori and visiting the gravesites of lost loved ones. Obon is not a national holiday, but traditionally, most people get three days or more off of work at this time to spend time with family.

    Fireworks

    Fireworks displays are considered to be part of summer festival season. They are often included in Tanabata and Obon, and they are also incorporated into small, local and regional festivals. Sometimes, fireworks displays themselves are the reason for community gatherings. These happen throughout the summer, all over the country.

    If you have can’t make it to Japan for festival season, you can make it to House of Genji for Japanese dining at its finest. Indulge in a Japanese cultural favorite—teppanyaki—as well as hibachi and a range of other Japanese staple dishes. Find out more about teppanyaki in San Jose and our other menu items by calling (408) 453-8120.

  • What Is Tempura?

    Not many people make tempura on their own, and instead they head to their local Japanese restaurant to get their fill. This dish originated in Portugal, but it was Japan that ultimately made it famous, which is why you can find it in Japanese restaurants. Keep reading to learn everything you need to know about tempura.

    Tempura is a seafood or vegetable dish that has been lightly battered and deep fried, and it’s become a staple of Japanese cuisine. The batter consists of chilled water, eggs, and flour, and it should come out thin and light. You can add ice to keep the batter cold, and don’t stir it so much that you remove all the lumps, or it won’t be crisp. After the fish or vegetables have been dipped in the batter, they are deep fried in a hot, neutral-flavored oil like canola.

    If you like Japanese dining, call House of Genji at (408) 453-8120 to set up a reservation with us. We are a Japanese restaurant serving San Jose, and you can learn much more about us by looking through our website.