• Planning a Work Party at Our Teppanyaki Restaurant

    If you’re looking for a fun way to bond with coworkers, consider holding a work party at House of Genji. Whether you’re looking for a unique experience for a holiday party or just an excuse to spend some time with your work friends out of the office, our teppanyaki restaurant is an essential ingredient in an event to remember. Here is what you need to know about planning a work party around our teppanyaki dining experience.

    What exactly is teppanyaki?

Teppanyaki refers to food that has been cooked on a hot iron—in other words, on a flat grill top. At a teppanyaki restaurant, a selection of food is prepared on a large grill that is surrounded by a dining table. Guests sit around the grill and watch their meals being cooked in front of them. Teppanyaki chefs always entertain their guests with their amazing knife skills and dramatic plating abilities.

What is served at a teppanyaki meal?

Teppanyaki is highly adaptable. Guests can choose from chicken, steak, lobster, shrimp, scallops, calamari, or some combination of meats. Soup, salad, rice, and veggies are also included. Some meals are also served with desserts. At House of Genji, we have a range of appetizers and side orders available to complement your meal, including edamame, age-gyoza, tempura, and agedashi tofu. We also offer sushi and sashimi and a variety of dinner salads.

Why is teppanyaki good for a work party?

Teppanyaki dining is very different from your standard work dinner. Thanks to the communal nature of the seating and cooking, you and your coworkers will get to enjoy a unique experience together. It’s the perfect opportunity to shrug off the demands of the office and focus on having fun together instead. Spending some time together bonding outside of work will help build more productive relationships in the office.

Start planning your work event at House of Genji today by calling our restaurant. Find out about our menus and set up a time to come to our teppanyaki restaurant in San Jose by calling (408) 453-8120.

  • A Look at Dining Etiquette in Japan

    When you visit Japan, there are many different customs you will get to experience. Japanese dining etiquette can often be confusing for Westerners visiting the country for the first time. Although everyone is understanding of how different the dining experience is for people visiting the country and are patient as you learn new etiquette rules, it can helpful to learn as much as you can about the norms before you go. Here is a closer look at some basic Japanese dining etiquette rules, so feel more relaxed in Japanese restaurants.

    Chopstick Basics

  • Using chopsticks can take practice, so use them whenever you get a chance before your visit. In Japan, don’t point chopsticks at people or dishes or wave them around while you’re talking. You shouldn’t suck any sauces off your chopsticks or stab foods that are hard to pick up. Never place your chopsticks upright in rice, which is symbolic of death, as is passing food with chopsticks. Don’t lay your chopsticks next to your plate when you’re done eating, as this indicates that you haven’t finished.

    Tipping

    Tipping is not common in Japan. In fact, it is often considered to be insulting. In restaurants, wait staff will often accept tips from Westerners in order to avoid embarrassing them. However, it’s best to avoid the practice completely—in restaurants, hotels, cabs, and anywhere else you would normally leave a tip in a Western country.

    Eating

    Something that may feel strange to Westerners but is expected in Japan is sipping directly from a soup bowl. Slurping is also encouraged, as it demonstrates that you are enjoying the food. Always clean your plate completely. Leaving anything behind, even a small amount of rice or sauce, is considered rude.

    At House of Genji, you’ll enjoy traditional Japanese teppanyaki dining and get plenty of chances to practice with your chopsticks. Contact us today at (408) 453-8120 to find our more about our cocktail lounge and menu of Japanese food in San Jose.